Wildlife Conservation Project adds Cheetahs

A Brief Look at Cheetah Conservation

Cheetahs are currently listed as “vulnerable.” This is due to the stress of climate change, habitat loss, and hunting. Therefore this puts pressure on the cheetah population, reproduction, and genetic diversity. With limited diversity, it makes it even more difficult for the species to adapt to these stressors and potential diseases.

Because of this, conservation efforts include introducing new genetic diversity from “visiting”cheetahs. And this is exactly what Kaya’s wildlife conservation project in Zimbabwe is working on!

Cheetahs Arrived in Zimbabwe

Our amazing Rhino and Elephant project in Zimbabwe recently added Cheetah conservation to their organization impact. This came after two cheetah brothers, Jabari and Kumbe, born at the Parc Safari in Canada arrived in the Zimbabwe conservation park. Now you might wonder, why bring an animal from captivity into the wild? Isn’t that irresponsible? Good question. Jabari and Kumbe are part of the Aspinall Foundation’s Back to the Wild initiative and will help cheetah conservation in Zimbabwe through repopulation initiatives. 

The cheetahs will spend 60 days in a quarantine before being released into the main conservancy. They will then be collared, surveyed and tracked using telemetry, as the staff collects data on their hunting successes and monitors their health and wellbeing. The cheetahs will learn to hunt and live in the conservation land, and once ready a female will be introduced to encourage breeding. Through breeding they will be helping the wildlife conservation effort by increasing the genetic diversity in the area and repopulating the reserves.

Can Kaya Volunteers or Interns Work with the Cheetah Conservation Project?

Yes! A Kaya volunteer or intern can work with the cheetah project alongside wildlife conservation work with the rhinos and elephants. Participants will get involved in the cheetah surveys, tracking, and data collection! This is a great experience for anyone interested in ecology, biology, and wildlife conservation.

In fact, any volunteer or intern arriving now through the end of May 2021 is eligible for a $210 USD discount for the Rhino, Elephant and Cheetah conservation project! Stay in a lodge with other volunteers on the 10,000 acres of conservation land to really soak up the beauty of wild Zimbabwe!

Travel to Zimbabwe during COVID

Kaya’s conservation project is currently open to volunteers and interns and is exempt from any country lockdowns as an ecotourism organization. Participants will need to provide a negative PCR test before departure and adhere to the organization’s social distancing, sanitizing and masking protocols. 

This project is located about an hour and a half from Harare, the capital of Zimbabwe. Therefore with fewer crowds, social distancing is much easier. The staff are fully trained and equipped for COVID-19 prevention and emergency protocols.

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Rhino, Elephant, and Cheetah Conservation Project

Learn more about this project and how you can save $210 (for arrivals through May 2021)

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